Wednesday, March 10, 2010

Special Ed Classrooms: The Happiest Place On Earth

Social stories are a simple, visual way of teaching children with autism and other disabilities appropriate behaviors. They cover situations like how to greet someone, how to take turns, and how to cross the street.

Or, in Brendan's case, how to make others "happy."

21 comments:

  1. I can think of a number of people who would benefit from this worksheet.

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  2. OMG!! That's awesome! I'm a special education teacher (deaf/hard of hearing). I've had one very memorable student that was deaf and autistic (honestly, in 9 years, he was my all time favorite).

    I think it's hard to teach some of those with a straight face. I once saw one all about appropraite sniffing. It started with 'can I sniff you?'. Bwahaha...

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  3. oh my goodness! that was priceless! i love it!! these kids are sooooo awesome! thanks for sharing

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  4. You know, once you see society's unwritten protocols spelled out in black and white, they seem a lot sillier. Why shouldn't a person be able to put his hands in his pants? If it makes him happy.

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  5. My FIL (who is not special needs) likes to tuck his hand inside his pants and it makes me SO uncomfortable. I seriously cannot carry on a conversation with him when he does that. Too bad a straightforward worksheet like this can't be given to him.

    ~ Sarah

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  6. I am a special education teacher, and I can't tell you how many languages I've had to learn to say, "please keep your hands out of your pants" in! :)

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  7. Oh, this made me laugh. Haven't gotten anything like this yet, but it's probably in my future.

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  8. Wow a lot of special ed teachers in this group! Count me in too! I love social stories, I find myself writing them in my head for the general public (or my husband, whatev). "Sometimes when I a cranky I knit-pick my wife. This is not a good choice. When I am cranky I should:
    Take a nap.
    Go for a walk.
    Buy my wife a present (okay maybe not that last one!)"


    Thank you for sharing! I love your Brendan stories! I must have watched his hair-cut video ten times! What a doll!

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  9. I agree with HeatherWasHere. I mean, how can we expect them to make others "happy" if you take away "hands in the pants"? C'mon!!!

    Wait, that came out a little wrong. (hehhehe)

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  10. I think we need to read that social story around my house... perhaps your next home teaching appointment. ;)

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  11. Noted. I have, it seems, a "sad" habit of putting my hands in the back of my pants. It keeps th warm.
    Lesson learned. Others will be happy if I keep them out but how do I keep them warm??? Huh?

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  12. BAHAHAHAAA! I am laughing so hard right now... this is hilarious...

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  13. just to clarify... we do not need this lesson in our home! it was just a joke...j.o.k.e.
    (PS- I love you honey)

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  14. Now, who couldn't benefit from a lesson like that??

    Ha haaaaaa! Awesome.

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  15. no wonder he's always got a smile on his face....

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  16. I need to hang that tutorial on my husbands forehead. ;0)

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  17. Unfortunately you didn't mention that BRENDAN Does NOT like these Social Stories. They make everyone else happy, but he is SAD. I talked with Kathy G. and she can relate, SHE even knows the Social Stories!!

    If you just take a look at all your comments, CAN'T you just see how everyone would love a BOOK... written by you? You just need to come up with the Perfect Title! Or perhaps a "365 Living With Autism" Picture Book (with captions). It would sell and people would buy it... Especially those working with Special Ed... at home, school and the professional fields. Glad you're out of Utah too... you are so much happier! Love, MOM

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  18. I laughed out loud when I read this! I was a teacher and there were many of my (non-autistic) students who did this. I had some interesting conversations with their parents...

    Thanks for sharing, this made my day!

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  19. ok, i never comment on anyone's blog but i found yours today via apartment therapy and have been oohning and awe-ing for several hours now. thanks for nothing (or everything!). i am the mother of a 9year old son with autism and this has been an issue for a couple years. why did i or anyone else, for that matter, never think of doing a social story-this is brilliant and just might do the trick. THANK YOU!! and finally, I appreciate all the work you put into your posts, gathering info, links, etc. I just absolutely love this place... it's everything i adore and aspire to!

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  20. How can I get a copy of this???

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    Replies
    1. It was in a packet of social stories that were specific to his behavior sent home from the teacher. I have no idea the original source. I'm so sorry!!

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